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Audience Audience Analysis Consumer Insights

“I want a feast
I want a bean feast

Cream buns and doughnuts and fruitcake with no nuts so good you could go nuts.

No, now!

I want a ball

I want a party

Pink macaroons and a million balloons and performing baboons and

Give it to me now.

I want the world,

I want the whole world.

I want to lock it all up in my pocket

It’s my bar of chocolate

Give it to me now!

I want today

I want tomorrow

I want to wear them like braids in my hair and I don’t want to share them

I want a party with roomfuls of laughter

Ten thousand ton of ice cream

And if I don’t get the things I am after

I’m going to scream!

I want the works,

I want the whole works!

Presents and prizes and sweets and surprises in all shapes and sizes,

And now!

Don’t care how I want it now!

Don’t care how I want it now!”

The above song may be a harmonious tantrum performed by one Veruca Salt in the 1971 film adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, but the lyrics speak to the way a hotel should perceive its guests. That’s not to say that all guests are sniveling, snotty-nosed adolescents, but for an industry that deals in comfort and convenience, it doesn’t hurt to operate under that assumption. The average overnighter takes for granted the luxuries a hotel provides. So when something does go awry, no matter how miniscule, the concierge often takes an ear-licking.

Guests expect their stay to go off without a hitch. They don’t want to see an establishment’s seams, so to speak. So, a hotel must present itself as competent, discreet and ahead of the curve. There are numerous approaches that can be taken to this end. Here, we discuss four:

1. Street propaganda:

Guerrilla marketing, a low budget, avant-garde approach to self-promotion can be highly effective in portraying an out of the box, curatorial image to a potential client; it also falls into the discreet category. A good propaganda campaign should promote with clever subtlety. Our Florida advertising agency knows the value of this technique lies in its ties to social media marketing. A really creative guerrilla strategy can take on a life of its own by inspiring observers to document their reactions through Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and countless other social media sites. The following link demonstrates several examples of unique street propaganda:

http://www.boredpanda.com/cool-and-creative-street-ads/

2. Easy online accessibility:

Hotel’s must make their website accessible and up-to-date. The site should leave no question unanswered. A customer should be able to book a room, dinner reservation or spa appointment with the touch of a mouse. They should be able to speak to a hotel representative via online chat. Basically, a hotel’s website should act as an interactive reception desk. Daily updates and notices regarding not just the hotel, but also the surrounding area can be helpful as well. It pays to work with a good developer who is aware of the latest advents and limitations of the Internet.

3. Go green image:

Environmentally conscious business practices are key. More so than a hotel making sure it’s operating with the tiniest footprint it can muster, it should also promote these efforts to its guests. If the restaurant in the hotel only uses organic, farm-to-table ingredients, this should be made known. If the lobby motif is made from recycled materials, shout it from the rooftops. After all, green is definitely the new black. Guests will respect any effort to that end.

4. Respond to online comments:

Yet another cheap and fruitful way to make a positive impression with an audience is to keep up with what that audience is saying. This is sort of a no brainer, but to be truly effective, don’t just keep track of sites like Trip Advisor or Travelocity. Instead, reply to comments, be those comments good or bad, with useful information. If a past guest complained about an obstructed room view, apologize and offer them a room with a better view during their next stay. If another applauds the tuna tartar at your dining establishment, thank them kindly and tell them they’re a real mensch for saying so. This practice makes a hotel seem more human; less like a machine on autopilot.

In search of a hotel advertising strategy to ensure that your visitors will also become your biggest fans? Contact our team of marketing experts today!

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Campaign Creation & Development Creative & Production

Over the past two decades, Moms have controlled up to 80% of household spending. When you break it down, they are not only buying for themselves but for many other age groups and demographics including adults, babies, tweens, teens, males and females. By putting in some consideration and tailoring your marketing campaigns to fit this influential consumer group, you could reap quite the harvest in customer conversion and tap into a market that will keep giving.
As a Florida advertising agency we make sure our clients consider the demographic they are marketing to. If the age range or product falls anywhere close to the “Mom” demographic, we like to ask the following questions as we develop or critique an existing marketing campaign:

Question 1: Are my marketing campaigns easy to read and navigate on a mobile phone?

From juggling careers, family schedules and keeping the home in order, Moms are always on the go and use their trusty mobile sidekicks to keep up the pace. According to BabyCenter’s September 2012 Media Mom Report, 65% of moms have smart phones (38% higher than the general US population). Quick, easy and straightforward is the name of the game when you’re dealing with Moms and mobile media. In fact, BabyCenter’s monthly poll states 91% of smartphone equipped Moms expect websites to be mobile friendly.

Pay specific attention to:

    • Clear click-through links: Consider the webpage that your ad, email campaign or image may link them to. Does it bring the audience straight to the desired destination? Or does it lead them to a home page that they would have to scroll through to find the information or product?
    • Mobile visuals: How does it visually look on the phone? Is the image clear? Is the color scheme eye-catching and easily understandable?
    • Clear call to action: Does the content clearly and concisely state what you would like them to do? For example: “Click Here to Order.”

Question 2: What kind of woman am I marketing to?

Stereotypes and assumptions of a Mom’s role can often be detrimental to a marketing campaign if skewed in the wrong direction. Mothers no longer fit within the “Leave it To Beaver” role these days and are sometimes categorized somewhere between stressed and tired or on an episode of Real Housewives. The truth is that Mom’s are women first, modern, forward thinking women who have added responsibilities like children, a spouse and other family members. Mom-hood doesn’t change the fact that they are still women and want to feel beautiful, empowered and all around badass, plus able to cook a mean grilled cheese sandwich.

Question 3: Just how social is my marketing campaign?

Moms are all about relationships and look to social sites like Facebook that promote that relational connection. In fact most Moms spend their socializing time on Facebook because of the information and content sharing capabilities between friends and family. Twitter has been found to be more influential with the tech savvy and higher wage-earning Mom. To reach the mainstream Mom market, use Facebook for social promotions and talk to those Moms because they are certainly talking too.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, contact our team of experts today! We’re poised to discuss strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine perfect target market for your business.

Resources:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/babycenter-reveals-five-trends-that-impact-the-business-of-mom-172863301.html
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703521304576278964279316994.html#project%3DNUMBERS_GUY_1104%26articleTabs%3Dinteractive%20OR%20http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703521304576278964279316994.html

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis

Sometimes, the rapid speed of technology makes me feel older than my years (and I’m not even that old!).  Back in my day, we didn’t have tablets or smart phones – most people didn’t even have computers.  We had to communicate to one another by dialing them on a home phone, and, if my parents couldn’t reach me because I wasn’t where I said I was going to be, then I would be in big trouble when I got home.

But things have changed a lot since then, and parents have lots of ways to keep track of their children.  Young people communicate through text messaging, preferring that method over email due to its convenience.  They don’t even really have to learn handwriting – they’re practically born with keyboards in their hands.  Even when dealing with a slightly older generation, some of the 20-somethings I know don’t even own televisions, since they get all of their media from the computer.

Interesting to think about, isn’t it?  These technologies that once were innovative and paved the future for us are now barely even relevant.  That’s why, as someone who works within digital media, I find it important to keep up with the newest technology – to play with it, own it and learn how to use it.

While TV is not dying anytime soon (how could it, with so many baby boomers who’ve grown up with televisions?), it’s important to take notice of the ways young people use, engage with and interact with technology.  This is a new generation, full of young people who are “digital natives.”  And, the disconnect is clear: while some marketers and advertisers have found ways to reach these people, lots of digital media initiatives still miss the mark.

For instance, I go on YouTube all the time, but I couldn’t name a single YouTube celebrity without the help of our marketing interns.  But they point me to Ray William Johnson and Daily Grace, both of whom are completely unrecognizable to parents, yet have millions of teen/young adult followers on the internet.

Or, take the popularity of mobile gaming.  Some people I know play games like Tetris or Bejeweled on their mobile devices, but young people take mobile gaming to a whole new level.  Through role-playing games that contain a social component, they can interact with an entire new world where in-game currency can be exchanged for real-life currency.

(And that DEFINITELY didn’t exist when I was a kid!)

If you work for a brand and are aiming to ramp up your digital presence, it is essential to keep track of the newest gadgets, games and trends in technology.  With an abundance of blogs like Gizmodo and TechCrunch, there’s no reason that marketers can’t be in touch with the ways that young people use tech.

As you’re planning your digital strategy, I encourage marketers to look toward the future.  With more technologies becoming widely available each day, it’s important to carefully plan your strategy to ensure that it’s reaching the audience where they are.  Our Orlando marketing agency advises you to spend a little bit of time getting to know what’s new in technology, in order to help gap between digitally divided generations.

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Branding Strategy & Positioning

When the producers at Viacom did some market data on their viewers, they discovered an interesting insight.  Moms would often put their children in front of the television to watch shows on Nickelodeon while they cooked, cleaned and did chores around the house, anytime between the hours of 5 p.m. and 10 p.m.  These mothers would then turn the TV off to put the kids to bed, returning sometime after 10 p.m. to sit in front of the television to relax for a moment, and to unwind from the day.

And the first channel these moms saw when they turned on their TVs?  It was Nickelodeon.

Viacom’s leading executives got creative with this insight and recently launched an effort to connect to these moms through a 2-hour television slot that runs programming geared toward moms from 10 p.m. until midnight (7 p.m. until 9 p.m. PST).  The idea was to capitalize on this routine action by introducing a brand targeted toward these moms during that time slot.  The answer?  NickMom.

But more than just a block of programming, NickMom is also a community. Women who watch the programming in the evening can also incorporate elements of social television, Tweeting and Facebooking about their favorite shows and bringing the channel into their homes on multiple screens.

One tiny insight led to an entire brand strategy overhaul at Viacom.  The insight is a powerful one, too.  Because of school schedules, soccer practices and piano lessons, plus work, many moms do not get to relax until the end of the day.

Marketers can use insights such as this to help their own companies to reach out to moms as well.  In many families, mom might sip a glass of wine to unwind as her family lay resting, sitting on the couch with her tablet in hand as she checks her email, messages friends on Facebook and browses on the online shops from her favorite retailers.  In fact, in 2011, the New York Times published an entire article on the phenomenon of inebriated shopping.  The article notes how companies like Gilt, Sacks, and QVC are capitalizing on the trend, noting spikes in sales around the evening hours, and also noting that the offers sent around these times generate results.  Though the Times article doesn’t specifically limit the tipsy shopping trend to moms, it’s worth noting that the article mentions various types of companies that cater to the female, 18-35 age group.

[quote]

Are you a social savvy mom? Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Linkedin, Pinterest and Youtube. You name it, we got it!

[/quote]

Even for moms who do not drink alcohol, the evening is time to relax.  Once dinner is served, dishes are washed and kids are asleep, people are happy, relaxed and ready to spend some time on themselves.  And, in this era of mobile devices, sitting down watching television doesn’t mean you have to quit browsing the Internet – you can browse from your phone, pausing your program at any time to make sure you don’t miss anything.

If you are trying to hone in on moms to help grow your business, perhaps it is worth experimenting with running an evening promotion, sending nighttime email blasts or posting on Facebook later in the evening, after work hours.  If you can reach the mom when she is feeling social and relaxed, you are not only are more likely to inspire a spontaneous purchase, but also to form a positive association between the mom and your brand.

Moms are a very particular target, and in many homes they hold the purchasing power to make decisions as to spending, budgeting and savings.  To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, check out our Florida marketing agency’s recent whitepaper on marketing to moms, which discusses strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine the right moms for your business.

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Consumer Insights Market Intelligence

When Facebook first began, it was a tool for students to connect with one another, typically within a limited age range of about 20-30.  Later, when Zuckerberg opened up the Facebook forum to people of all ages, more people learned about the value of reaching out to one another using what is now the world’s largest social network.  What was once seen as cool and limited to a select group of people who were “in the know” became open to everyone.  A college student would cringe to open up his friend requests to see, smiling back at him, an image of his own mother.
But these days, it’s the norm for mothers of all types to connect with their children and with other moms using Facebook, Twitter and other popular social networks.  As women are seeing the benefits of technology, more of them are also investing in tablets and smart phones, which provide ways for them to stay connected.

Facebook is a revolutionary tool for mothers, who often post pictures of their children and families to share with friends.  In fact, many young mothers make their living from blogging and working remotely in social fields, as doing so allows them the flexibility to stay home with their children while still allowing them to earn a living.  Older mothers have found the value of using Facebook to help them stay connected to business contacts.

[quote]For advertisers, moms are a highly coveted demographic, as they are often the ones who have the power to make purchasing decisions for items such as diaper brands, video games, and children’s cereals, among other things.  [/quote]It seems like a no-brainer that these mothers would engage in significant social sharing activity – through social networking sites, they stay connected.

At a recent BlogHer conference sponsored by a number of mommy-friendly companies like Diet Pepsi and Johnson & Johnson, hundreds of moms got together to discuss trends in social media and digital networking.  These aren’t your traditional soccer moms – many of these moms were urban professionals who make a living in the digital media industry, networking to reach out to other moms to create and maintain a community.

Sites like Babble.com cater to what they call “a new generation of parents,” writing articles with titles like “18 Ways to Keep Yourself Feeling Sexy During a Dry Spell.”  In essence, this ain’t your mama’s website…. Except actually, it is!

So, back to the core question – how social are moms?  In a word, incredibly.  Neilsen reports that moms are some of the biggest influencers out there, and use social media to stay connected to one another.  They are:

– 81 percent more likely to become a fan of or follow a brand online

– 86 percent more likely to post a status update

– 84 percent more likely to comment or post content than the general population.

Of course, there may be demographic shifts due to the age of the parent, location, household income and a host of other factors.  But, the mother of one four-year-old I know has hundreds of connections on LinkedIn, due at least partially due to her propensity to use LinkedIn as a networking tool to help her grow her small business.

As social media continues to grow and expand, so too will the ways in which mothers reach out to one another through social media.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, check out our Florida marketing agency’s recent whitepaper on marketing to moms, which discusses strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine the right moms for your business.

Are you a socially savvy mom? Connect with us on Facebook!

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Branding Campaign Creation & Development Creative & Production Identity

Once you’ve figured out your brand identity, it is essential to determine how to move forward with a campaign that strategically addresses your target consumer.  While the types of campaigns you can run are as varied as the types of businesses themselves, you can use some of our tips to help you design something that works efficiently and effectively to help target your ideal consumer.

Go Where Your Audience Is:  Think you know your audience, and that they’re all on Facebook?  You may be mistaken.  These days, Pinterest is extremely popular with adult women, while male geek-types may use Reddit more than Twitter.  Some children even view Facebook as something that only their parents use – certainly, no 12-year-old wants to hang out where his mom hangs out.  If you don’t know where to find your target consumer, it’s imperative to find out before you develop a social media campaign.

Keep Your Expectations Realistic:  If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my years as a strategist, it’s that no one can make a video go viral.  This is particularly true if it doesn’t reach a person on an emotional level, such as through humor or heart.  If you think simply telling someone about your product or service in a video will garner millions of views, it’s important to review your strategy.  Instead, consider what will appeal to your audience, and market toward their emotions.

Remember the Brand Power of a Comprehensive Campaign:  Your Twitter strategy is getting tons of interaction, and your Instagram account gets hundreds of “likes” every time.  But something still seems amiss in terms of success.  What’s going on?

Perhaps it’s first important to address whether there is a clear call to action established within the context of the campaign.  If the goal is to get new followers, then reaching out to the people on Twitter who already follow your company doesn’t do much good.  In order to create the best interactive campaign you can create, our Orlando ad agency advises you to find ways to efficiently integrate several multimedia platforms if possible.  You can talk about your Instagram photo contest on Twitter and sync it with Facebook, or you can create a TV ad with a clear call to action to ask people to follow you on your various social media accounts.  Carefully consider the medium, the message and the desired goal.

Keep It Agile:  Even amazing ideas may fail sometimes (remember Friendster, the precursor to MySpace [which was the precursor to Facebook]?).  But, if you’ve formulated a strategy that you can pivot as it takes shape, you’re far ahead of your competition and, in some cases, can prevent major PR disasters should your plan go awry.

Learn From Mistakes:  Every single company in the world makes mistakes from time to time, and often these mistakes involve failed marketing strategies.  Examine what went wrong, and what you could do differently.  Even in the case of a successful campaign, it is important to examine the results in order to help duplicate success in the future.

Follow these brand identity tips, and our Florida advertising agency assures that you’ll hit the target consumer with the target strategy at the right time.

Take a second to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. We’re witty and we know it!

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Audience Audience Analysis Consumer Journey Mapping

In a world where children aren’t being taught cursive (because, frankly, who needs it when you have a tablet?), it’s getting harder and harder for marketers to stay in touch with the younger generation.  Back in our day, we didn’t have to worry about chargers and crashing devices – in fact, we could just tell our teachers that the dog ate our homework.

The digital age marks a time where children are growing up with Facebook and using electronic devices to learn through interactive games.  Remember the years that parents spent questioning whether it was appropriate to sit our children down in front of the television for hours on end?  Looking toward the future, we’ll have the same questions about the tablet, in addition to things we never had to worry about such as cyberbullying, internet predators and other as of yet unknown cyber threats.

But, there are also a lot of positives – children who are learning how to use devices at a young age are also testing higher in certain academic subjects, at least in part due to the fact that their parents are treating their devices as tools in the education process.

So, how can this information help a marketer who is trying to reach a multi-screen generation?

First of all, it is important to remember that things are much different than they were back then.  As much as we were dazzled by cereal commercials and Smoky the Bear, children are living in a different world than we did.  Technology has changed everything; even the idea of a smartphone would have been a fantasy when I was ten years old.

A marketer who is trying to reach a multi-screen generation can work to do so by creating interactive games that create an engaging experience for a child.  Obviously, there are privacy restrictions, particularly when it comes to collecting information about children and advertising to them.  But games are typically a safety net – a company-sponsored game using augmented reality or other features helps reach a child with its high levels of stimulation.  You can also reach them by having a fun and interactive website.

[quote]Though I mostly focus on the use of technology in the digital space, hand-to-hand marketing is still one of the most effective ways to reach children.  [/quote]At our Orlando marketing agency, we often advise clients to market at events catered to children and teens, and to tie it in with a digital strategy.  If children have smartphones, there may be ways for a child to directly engage with your brand through the use of social media.  Perhaps they can unlock rewards with their Facebook check-ins, or by offering testimonials as to your product that you can post on YouTube and other media outlets.  Because our adolescents and teens have grown up in a digital world, they are practically socialized to do these things, which is why they are of special interest to marketers.

If you do engage in good old-fashioned television advertising, it may be beneficial to integrate your campaign with an interactive digital component.  Nokia’s recent Work for Will campaign, featuring  Up All Night’s Will Arnett (also of Arrested Development fame), invited people to log online to create a digital product, in order to be given the chance be Will Arnett’s personal assistant for a day.

Marketing to a multi-screen generation means thinking like someone with multitude of screens.  If your advertising and marketing campaign doesn’t reach your younger audience on all screens, then allow our Florida advertising agency to design one for you that will!

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Content Marketing Creative & Production

College students and recent college graduates love social media.  According to a January 2012 survey published by CampusLIVE (now DailyBreak), 73% of college students use some form of social media in their everyday lives.  For many people, this is indicative of a young culture that has grown up with social media all around them.  (Or maybe it just accounts for a lot of UCF students Facebooking during class.)
It can be tempting to hire a student or college graduate to handle your company’s social media.  Hiring a student is typically cheaper than hiring a Florida marketing agency to handle your social media, but is this really a good idea?

Consider the case of Red Cross, where a social media specialist sent out a drunken Tweet from the highly respected organization’s Twitter account.  The message said in part, “…when we drink we do it right #gettinslizzered.”  The person who sent the Tweet, Gloria Huang, admitted in a follow-up message that her error was based on her unfamiliarity with how to properly use Hootsuite, a social media management application.  Such an oversight has the substantial capacity to diminish a brand’s strength. (Although, it was HILARIOUS to see that post coming from a leading non-profit).

While this particular case was an employee error, it has major implications as to the types of harm that can result from inexperienced users “#gettinslizzered” on the job.  A brand’s social media is an extension of its identity, and in the same way Apple would never risk its impeccable reputation by putting its social media in the hands of someone who just passed the legal drinking age, it may not be wise to entrust your own brand to someone with little experience in brand management strategies.  Even at a local level, working with an Orlando advertising agency will allow your business to more effectively leverage trending topics and popular events in order to ensure that your business’s social media truly is an embodiment of your brand.

Contrary to what many people think, it takes significant time and effort to manage a company’s social media.  For most businesses, social strategy should be framed as its own entity, rather than as an extension of editorialized brand content.  Of course, if your social media strategy requires more of a plan than posting puppy photos and keeping your fingers crossed for the best, it might require more resources.  As such, it may be in your business’s best interest to hire an Orlando marketing agency with a division dedicated to social media.

Media experts, such as those with a full-fledged advertising and media agency background, fully comprehend the tactics behind successful marketing, advertising and customer service.  These individuals attend conferences and seminars pertaining to social media growth and expansion, and have a much deeper understanding of the consumer cycle from an overall brand strategy perspective.  For example, who might be a better person to run your FourSquare brand page account than the social media expert who just spent her dinner discussing the state of the industry with Dennis Crowley?  (Here’s a hint: it’s probably not the girl who just spent her dinner eating Ramen while discussing the state of Seal and Heidi Klum’s breakup.)

Just because a person can write a few funny Tweets doesn’t mean that individual can understand the significance of the Facebook API, or knows how to effectively pull and apply complex data analytics for future use.  These extremely valuable facets help companies build strong and compelling multi-pronged social media strategies, and can help to elicit customer engagement by doing more than posting random comments about the VMAs and the Kardashian family that don’t effectively generate a future return.

Social media has the potential to reach millions of people in seconds.  A social media goof can lead to a public relations disaster that can cause a consumer perception to sink faster than the Titanic (read: the recent case of Progressive Insurance), and the risk of such faux pas is greater with someone who lacks the experience to understand what it means to manage and maintain a brand identity.

As with most digital content strategies, it’s typically better to invest in resources to find a person who has demonstrated digital media marketing capabilities.  At even the most fundamental levels, it can be extremely difficult to execute social media engagement, even for seasoned professionals.  Therefore, it’s important to carefully consider whether it makes sense to have a student manage the online presence of the entire brand.  If you do opt to go in this direction rather than working with the experts at an Orlando ad firm, you may find your brand strategy schooled by the professionals.

If all this has given you something to Tweet home about, contact us as we offer a full multi-pronged advertising and social media approach to help you develop and maintain a branding plan that won’t come down with a case of senioritis.

Categories
Audience Audience Analysis Digital Targeting Services Media & Analytics

Got your brand perfected? All your social media marketing ducks all in a row?
Well don’t stop there. Reward your customers for their loyalty with a real, tangible product that can also catapult your brand presence offline. A well-made, well-designed t-shirt can do just that. When executed correctly, a t-shirt can be quite a valuable marketing tool. Think of it as cost-effective, word-of-mouth advertising—social media in a real-life social setting. And who doesn’t love a t-shirt—especially when it’s free! Think of all the times you’ve seen fans go bananas for a free t-shirt at a Magic game or at a concert or event.

But of course, your customers have to actually wear it for the whole thing to work. Start with a graphic or message that will connect with your target audience, then make sure you meet what we call the “t-shirt trifecta”: comfortable material, proper fit, and quality ink.Your printer may never mention ink types when you place your order, so it’s up to you to address the issue when collecting pricing and quantities. Don’t overlook this important part of the process or you will risk printing t-shirts that you and your customers will never want to wear.

So what’s the best ink to use on your tee? There are two major types of inks used by today’s screen printers: water based and plastisol. The latter is a thermoplastic, so it will melt or smear when in contact with heat like an iron. It will also feel thicker to the touch than a water-based print. Plastisol inks are often cheaper for printers to use and, over time, they will chip or peel after repeated washings.

Thus, plastisol inks are not our favorite inks at BIGEYE. In our opinion, water-based inks are always the way to go. It’s a little more expensive, but totally worth it in the end. Water-based inks are softer, lighter, and more eco-friendly than plastisol inks. When you place your hand over a graphic printed with water-based ink, it won’t feel stiff like a plastisol-printed graphic would. In fact, you’ll barely feel the graphic at all since water-based inks seep deep into fabric.

We’ve recently designed and printed a variety of t-shirts for many of our clients, and the results have pretty impressive, especially when the “t-shirt trifecta” is met. It’s a great feeling when we see people around town wearing our clients’ tees or even our own.

Check out this photo of our newest BIGEYE tee, designed for the summer and of course, printed with our favorite water-based ink.

Our team can be a big help if you’re thinking about getting tees of your own. Call us at 407.839.8599.

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Audience Audience Analysis Branding Conversion Optimization Creative & Production Digital Targeting Services Media & Analytics Media Analysis & Measurement Real Time Monitoring & Tracking Strategy & Positioning

The highly esteemed Associated Press Stylebook, also known as the “Journalist’s Bible,” has recently inducted “unfollow,” “retweet,” “tagging,” and 18 other social media terms into its newly revised 2011 print edition. Surprised? We’re not. Over the past several years, new connotations of such words have emerged through social networking sites, and have moseyed their way into day-to-day dialogues.
Language is extremely fluid, changing and adapting to current culture. A “wall” is no longer just a structure that ensures personal space; it’s now a public space where “friends” can post comments, videos and pictures.

Created in 1953, the AP Stylebook has been a very prestigious source of information for more than 50 years. The fact that the AP editors think social media terms are worth publishing just goes to show the impact social media platforms have on the public.

Social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube offer successful routes toward global communication, allowing you to essentially keep a public account of what’s happening in your world, and follow the lives of others. And it’s not just the younger generation that’s “tweeting,” but corporate companies and other professional organizations are as well. Company leaders are utilizing social media sites to increase exposure on the same platforms as their target audience. Even the AP Stylebook tweeted about the addition of these social media terms!

With technology continuously progressing and advancing, the digital world is becoming the most efficient way to do, well … just about everything! So, in the past, if you have been wary about engaging in the alternate universe we call social networking, don’t be afraid. Submerge yourself; you will be surprised at the endless possibilities available to you within just a few clicks.

Ready to jump in? Give us a call at 407.839.8599, or email us at info@bigeyecreative.com