3 Questions to Ask When Creating Brand Preference in Moms

For marketers who are aimed at creating brand preference in moms, it is useful to take a look at the brand itself. You want to attract the right types of moms for the brand, as attracting the wrong type can lead to dilution of brand value. Look at what your brand has to offer the mom market, and then embellish those qualities that allow it to stand out amongst competitors by asking a few key questions:

1. Is our brand memorable?

Though the brand doesn’t necessarily need to be in a mom’s face at all times, she does need exposure to the brand and needs ways to be able to find it when needed. In this era, being able to find the brand means that she can find it in the store, using Google, on Amazon, or social media sites.[quote]The harder it is to instill the brand into one’s memory, the harder it will be for brands to generate loyalty in their targets.[/quote] In order to help make the brand memorable, it’s essential to go to the platforms where moms are sharing information with one another in order to leave a lasting impression.

2. Is our brand meaningful?

Whether it’s enjoying a meal together at Olive Garden or walking through the mall in attention-getting Gucci shades, the brands that have positive impacts on the target’s lives are the ones that will succeed in creating preference. Without meaning, there’s no difference between buying Huggies and buying store brand diapers; but many moms are more apt to go for the Huggies because of their variety of facets, such as age-appropriate diapers, that help ease the frustrations of changing diapers. Huggies have made a connection point not only in their marketing, but also in their appeal to make the lives of women easier.

3. Is our brand likable?

Brand marketers should work to ensure that their brands are in line with the desires of mothers. A brand with a tough edge can open up it’s market to the modern mom by softening up, portraying the brand as likeable and fun. The brand marketer should embellish the aspects of their products that make moms’ lives easier, more exciting and more fulfilled. A company that sells necessities for children can better reach moms by bundling items such as diapers and baby wipes. Also, with new developments in big data, it’s easy to monitor what your users are saying about your products on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other social media outlets. Make sure that you are listening to the conversation, engaging your audience and taking quick action to resolving any problems that may arise.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, contact our team today! We’ll share strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine the right moms for your business.

Simple Marketing Tips and Tidbits You Need To Know

As the saying goes, you learn something new every day. That’s especially true in marketing, where sometimes even the smallest steps can lead to the largest payoff.

The items below are simple marketing tidbits we’ve learned after endless trial and error, and that we’re passing along to you because we think you can benefit from our Florida marketing agency’s blood, sweat and tears.

1. Putting a site wide search box can offer you great insight as to what people are trying to find when they come to your site, as you can track these searches through Google Analytics. If you run a blog, capitalize on this by producing content in accordance with what you find.

2. Only 9% of U.S. small and medium-sized businesses are optimized for mobile. This is true even though 34% of Americans admit that their cell phones are the primary device they use for going online, and smartphones and tablets accounted for more than 15% of all ecommerce sales in 2013. That number also fails to take into account the large number of people who browsed ecommerce sites from their phones or tablets but waited until they were at a computer or retail location to make purchases. Some experts estimate failure to optimize for mobile may cost these businesses, on average, $40,000 to $60,000 per year.

3. There are dozens of tools to use to determine how well your site functions and to identify problem areas. Try keying your site domain name into http://nibbler.silktide.com/ to see how it stacks up.

4. Maintaining an active Google+ site makes it more likely that your brand page will stand out on search engines. Moz reports that a URL’s number of +1s is highly correlated with its ranking in search. While Google claims +1s aren’t directly tied to search rankings, each +1 creates a link back to the post, which increases a site’s number of inbound links. These inbound links are one of the factors search engine algorithms use to determine the credibility of a site.

5. According to Experian (via Salesforce), $44.25 is the ROI for every $1 spent on email marketing. Even in spite of this, only 11% of emails are optimized for mobile. [quote]Many ecommerce sites don’t even collect emails.[/quote] To get the most out of collecting emails, implement a highly visible, yet non-intrusive email submission form front and center on your homepage.

6. More Facebook page likes doesn’t necessary mean better business for your company. What’s most important is the quality of the follower. Having lots of low-quality followers could actually be detrimental to your brand. Don’t believe it? Check out this article and pay special attention to the video from Veritasim. We’ve actually seen significant success for some brands with Facebook Ads, so take the experiments with a grain of salt.

Interested in learning more? Contact us today to start the conversation!

Resort Marketing Tips That Turn Small Budgets Into Big Results

In the hospitality business, it’s sometimes necessary to slash budgets, and unfortunately, sometimes the people who suffer that the most are the people in the marketing department. Hotel and resort managers may be hesitant to invest money in projects unless they can see a clear return on investment, which is sometimes not easy to prove in the world of marketing, and in social media marketing in particular.

However, companies that are struggling with small marketing budgets should look at this as a competitive advantage. At the outset, it seems counterintuitive: with large budgets, shouldn’t the businesses be able to spend more money to get the things they need?

Smaller budgets push hospitality marketers to work more creatively. It allows them to focus more closely on one facet of marketing that is often overlooked by larger corporations: the people.

That’s right. Sometimes, hotel chains or mega resorts become so big that it seems as though they somehow forget about the community that got them there in the first place. By thinking small and using it as an advantage, these smaller businesses are able to facilitate more direct relationships with their customers, something that larger businesses try unsuccessfully to do all the time.

For tourism and resort marketers and others in the hospitality industry, here are a few tips from our Florida ad agency that will help guide your resort marketing efforts, even if you’re working on a shoestring budget.

1. Be Genuine

There’s something humbling about receiving an email from a mom and pop, independently owned businesses that take pride in offering visitors impeccable service. People in these types of businesses are there because they want to be there; unlike at some major chains where people are simply there because they need the job.[quote]By putting the emphasis on the relationship with the customer, the smaller shop has an advantage in that it can tailor its service to the needs of the individual.[/quote]

2. Use Social Media as a Way to Engage the Community

When dealing in social media, the only budgetary restriction is time. But, the platform itself is free, and by investing in a good social media manager, a company can reap the rewards of someone who is skilled at interacting with people, who is also a customer service master and a pro brand advocate.

Since some of the best marketers a brand can have are influencers within an engaged community, allocating some investment in social media can help the company grow its social media presence, thereby helping it stay connected to its audience. For resort marketers, this is especially valid, as your audience may be comprised of people from all over the world.

3. Show That You’re Reliable and Trustworthy

Another advantage that smaller resorts have over big chains is that they have a more intimate connection to their customers. Who hasn’t tried to contact a large hotel chain and ended up feeling like more of a robot than a human being? Resorts that offer a hands-on approach to marketing and customer service can prove they have their customers’ best interests at heart. And, at its core, real resort marketing is about being authentic, and going above and beyond customers’ expectations.

4. Keep It Simple

So, you don’t have it in your budget to run a big TV ad takeover or a massive billboard campaign. That doesn’t matter, because working with a smaller budget allows resort marketers to tailor their marketing efforts to the people who are most likely to offer a return on that investment. Rather than trying to copy the pros, try instead to simplify marketing efforts to see how members of the community react. Chances are, they will appreciate the attention to detail that goes into these types of marketing efforts, and will reward your business by thinking of your resort first when it comes to making travel plans.

In these days of high-tech services and constant distraction, sometimes people just want to make a connection with another human being. People are hungry for this social connection that seems to be lost in the digital age. For large businesses, that connection can seem impossible, but for smaller resorts, it seems like a natural way to allow employees and staff to be truly authentic in their communication and marketing efforts.

The team here at our Florida marketing agency can help your resort marketing team to grow the brand on any budget. For more ideas and suggestions as to how to establish authenticity in your brand, contact us for a consultation.

How You Can Better Understand the Customer Journey

I’m always baffled when I learn about marketers who don’t have a full understanding of their customers’ behaviors. To me, the customer’s journey is the first place marketers should turn when trying to analyze ways they can improve their business. From a theoretical perspective, understanding the journey helps the marketer understand the business itself. Oftentimes, marketers who instinctively look to the customer journey don’t have a specific name for it; at our Florida marketing agency, we think clarifying why customer’s take a certain journey is a huge step in growing a business.

Analyzing a customer journey offers an opportunity for marketers to learn about how awareness leads to a purchase or other action. Assessing the customer journey helps determine whether, for example, the client should spend more money on awareness efforts or should stick to optimizing a website.

[quote]The customer journey first involves looking at where people get most of their information about a company’s products or services.[/quote]Years ago, marketers could create conversions after connecting with a customer approximately seven times, typically though print or television advertising. However, because of the rise of social media, these various touches don’t always create as much impact, and now marketers suggest that it requires between 20-30 touch points to gain a new customer.

In the digital space, social media steers these touch points, driving the first step in the customer journey: awareness. Be it paid or owned social media, this is often the first line of contact. However, it can also come from paid or organic search. Understanding where customers are finding out about your product or service helps target your advertising efforts to where you’re more likely to drive traffic to your website.

Next comes consideration. This is where it becomes important for a marketer to convince a person that a product or service is right for them. This requires having a strong understanding of your target demographic, complete with user personas. Having a firm understanding of your target customer can help guide all brand decisions, and the results of these decisions should be able to push people into the next phase of the customer journey: intent.

While good UX should always be a strong consideration when building a website or virtual shopping cart, it’s most important in the intent phase. Think of Amazon.com’s shopping cart feature. Sometimes, people who drop off at this point may have intent to purchase, but forget or drop off for some other reason. This is where strategies such as ad retargeting can be helpful, reminding the user of their intent to purchase.

Citing Amazon again, think of “1-Click” ordering. A person can choose to purchase in a single click, making the user experience as flawless as possible… and giving people fewer chances to change their minds between the intent phase and the next phase: the purchase.

Finally, the customer will make a purchase, resulting in a sale for the business. However, this is not necessarily the end of the customer journey; some marketers link this back to advocacy, such as when a person writes a glowing product review or shares it with friends.

Understanding your customer’s journey can help marketers find ways to simplify the process by cutting out friction in the purchasing or conversion phases. For more information on ways to simplify the customer journey, contact our Florida marketing agency for a consultation.

The Differing Appeals of the Healthcare Field in the Mom Market

Once a marketer has addressed the proper mom segment for his product or service, it becomes time for him to create an approach that reaches out to her. Finding an appeal that works to address the target helps generate brand preference down the line.

Just as there are multiple methods for subdividing the moms market, there are multiple appeals that are effective within the moms market. These may be appeals rooted in emotions, practicality, humor, fantasy, adventure, or a number of other types of appeals that relate to the needs, wishes and desires of the mom.

Different industries will see success with different appeals. A heartfelt appeal may be of less value to a luxury goods manufacturer than an appeal that offers a notion of adventure or fantasy. Industry-specific appeals can help drive the audience’s imagination, thereby beginning the process of instilling brand preference. Below, we will examine the appeals of the healthcare field.

People need healthcare services throughout every stage of their lives. Therefore, healthcare organizations tend to be family-friendly, fostering an environment of care and support, much as the family unit does. This also leads to marketers to hone in marketing to moms within this sector by emphasizing a commitment to care and service.

However, because of costs, service quality, expertise and other factors, moms have innumerable choices when it comes to providing healthcare for themselves and their families. Healthcare marketers may wish to convert new customers and retain existing ones by marketing in a manner that speaks to either the mom’s rational side or her emotional side.

Rational Appeals

[quote]Reaching out to moms by addressing their rationality is a strong tactic for healthcare marketers.[/quote]A rational appeal is a grounded approach that backs up marketing information with data-specific information and expertise in order to help sway the mother into making the “best” choice for her family. For example, when a marketer notes that four out of five doctors recommend a product, this appeals to rationality – if the doctors agree that it is the best product, then certainly it’s good enough for a mother and her family unit.

  • Statistics. Statistics are great ways to create a rational appeal. If studies show that your child will be 90% safer with a certain type of car seat, it is likely that a responsible mother is going to be willing to spend extra money to ensure her child’s safety.
  • Expertise. Backing up claims with expertise is also a great tool that marketers in the healthcare field can use to create rational appeal. A product endorsement from a noted physician or health care organization can help increase sales, as people are inclined to respect the product as they respect the noted professionals. An endorsement or testimonial assures the viewer or reader that the marketed product is effective, safe and useful.

Emotional Appeals

[quote]Designed to reach the mother at a greater level, the emotional appeal should elicit a deep feeling in the mother.[/quote]By nature, mothers are protective and offer a safety net for their children, as a mother is expected to help keep her child away from harm and to foster an environment of education and care. Touching on aspects of the child’s life that may jeopardize those elements will prompt the mom to act in a certain manner, and brands can recreate these feelings to help appeal to the mom, particularly when it comes to healthcare marketing.

  • Fear. No matter how brave we might seem, there are some things that we fear on a daily basis. In the world of healthcare marketing, these items may be as broad as increased risk of illness, or keeping a child away from injury. It may also involve continual monitoring of a child to ensure that he or she is in good health. Marketers can help warn of the potential dangers by using a tactic designed to instill fear into mothers, thereby causing them to take action. Demonstrating dangers and then providing solutions is a solid way for healthcare marketers to make sure that they are sending their messages loud and clear.
  • Comfort, Security and Safety. On the other hand, a strategy that incorporates comfort, security and safety may also provide a powerful incentive for moms to invest resources into healthcare. A hospital that idealizes itself as a caring environment may appear to be better suited for a sick child than a competing hospital that does not offer a feeling of comfort.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, contact us today! Our team at BIGEYE is prepared to share tangible strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine the right moms for your business!

Unlock The Power of Using Babies to Market Your Brand

Babies are adorable! There’s nothing in the world as beautiful as a smiling newborn. For years, marketers have caught on to this, providing uplifting content that features babies in the forefront. One example is an Evian campaign that features babies on roller skates, dancing to “The Rapper’s Delight.” The video has over 18 million views on YouTube. Another example is the famous E*Trade baby commercials that we look forward to while watching the Superbowl every year.

But beyond just babies, the team at our Orlando marketing agency thinks the fanfare around using babies to market your brand offers opportunities to make emotional connections to their target consumers. By being able to identify with their users, marketers can target the emergence of celebrity baby stories, and can often leverage these no matter what their relationship to baby products.

Through Twitter and Facebook, companies attach to celebrity baby stories that seem to fall in line with their brand stories and brand visions. Motherhood and maternity-oriented businesses seem to be especially in line with welcoming newborns, though it seems that broader companies like Target and Wal-Mart could stand to benefit just the same.

When the royal baby was born merely months ago, Twitter was on fire with tweets from marketers around the globe. Pampers used the birth of Baby George to promote a video under the pretense of the fact that every baby is a prince or princess, which it had obviously been waiting to push until the moment the Royal Baby arrived.

Marketers also catch on the tabloid celebrity baby fads. When Kim Kardashian and hotheaded celebrity Kanye West, recently gave birth to their daughter North West, marketers flocked to the notion that the baby could epitomize what it means to be a luxury baby brand. Additionally, there are rumors that Kim herself is planning to launch a clothing line for babies, attesting to the marketing power of celebrity status and the Kardashian family’s ability to capitalize on it.

[quote]The luxury baby market is expected to be a $10.4 billion industry in 2014, with strollers going for as much as $3,000 for an Aston Martin brand leather stroller.[/quote]

By latching on to uplifting baby stories, marketers can identify with the emotions behind the brand’s mission. In joining the conversation, these marketers prove they are in tune with things that are happening in the world, and that they are appreciative of the uplifting nature of a good celeb baby story.

Be it Alec Baldwin, Fergie or Simon Cowell, fans love and support stars on their mission to start or continue growing their families. By offering comforting tweets about celebrity babies, marketers can seize the opportunity to join the conversation, while also pushing their products incidentally.

Brand are solidified based on their relationships with potential customers, so encouraging chatter about celebrity babies and being early informers of such breaking news helps drive a brand’s social media.

The best thing about all this is that people aren’t going to stop having babies anytime soon, and as long as there are babies, there will be opportunities for people to love seeing them. The team at our Florida marketing agency thinks celebrity #babies can help brands see #success! Contact us today to learn more!