The Differing Appeals of the Healthcare Field in the Mom Market

Once a marketer has addressed the proper mom segment for his product or service, it becomes time for him to create an approach that reaches out to her. Finding an appeal that works to address the target helps generate brand preference down the line.

Just as there are multiple methods for subdividing the moms market, there are multiple appeals that are effective within the moms market. These may be appeals rooted in emotions, practicality, humor, fantasy, adventure, or a number of other types of appeals that relate to the needs, wishes and desires of the mom.

Different industries will see success with different appeals. A heartfelt appeal may be of less value to a luxury goods manufacturer than an appeal that offers a notion of adventure or fantasy. Industry-specific appeals can help drive the audience’s imagination, thereby beginning the process of instilling brand preference. Below, we will examine the appeals of the healthcare field.

People need healthcare services throughout every stage of their lives. Therefore, healthcare organizations tend to be family-friendly, fostering an environment of care and support, much as the family unit does. This also leads to marketers to hone in marketing to moms within this sector by emphasizing a commitment to care and service.

However, because of costs, service quality, expertise and other factors, moms have innumerable choices when it comes to providing healthcare for themselves and their families. Healthcare marketers may wish to convert new customers and retain existing ones by marketing in a manner that speaks to either the mom’s rational side or her emotional side.

Rational Appeals

[quote]Reaching out to moms by addressing their rationality is a strong tactic for healthcare marketers.[/quote]A rational appeal is a grounded approach that backs up marketing information with data-specific information and expertise in order to help sway the mother into making the “best” choice for her family. For example, when a marketer notes that four out of five doctors recommend a product, this appeals to rationality – if the doctors agree that it is the best product, then certainly it’s good enough for a mother and her family unit.

  • Statistics. Statistics are great ways to create a rational appeal. If studies show that your child will be 90% safer with a certain type of car seat, it is likely that a responsible mother is going to be willing to spend extra money to ensure her child’s safety.
  • Expertise. Backing up claims with expertise is also a great tool that marketers in the healthcare field can use to create rational appeal. A product endorsement from a noted physician or health care organization can help increase sales, as people are inclined to respect the product as they respect the noted professionals. An endorsement or testimonial assures the viewer or reader that the marketed product is effective, safe and useful.

Emotional Appeals

[quote]Designed to reach the mother at a greater level, the emotional appeal should elicit a deep feeling in the mother.[/quote]By nature, mothers are protective and offer a safety net for their children, as a mother is expected to help keep her child away from harm and to foster an environment of education and care. Touching on aspects of the child’s life that may jeopardize those elements will prompt the mom to act in a certain manner, and brands can recreate these feelings to help appeal to the mom, particularly when it comes to healthcare marketing.

  • Fear. No matter how brave we might seem, there are some things that we fear on a daily basis. In the world of healthcare marketing, these items may be as broad as increased risk of illness, or keeping a child away from injury. It may also involve continual monitoring of a child to ensure that he or she is in good health. Marketers can help warn of the potential dangers by using a tactic designed to instill fear into mothers, thereby causing them to take action. Demonstrating dangers and then providing solutions is a solid way for healthcare marketers to make sure that they are sending their messages loud and clear.
  • Comfort, Security and Safety. On the other hand, a strategy that incorporates comfort, security and safety may also provide a powerful incentive for moms to invest resources into healthcare. A hospital that idealizes itself as a caring environment may appear to be better suited for a sick child than a competing hospital that does not offer a feeling of comfort.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, contact us today! Our team at BIGEYE is prepared to share tangible strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine the right moms for your business!

Unlock The Power of Using Babies to Market Your Brand

Babies are adorable! There’s nothing in the world as beautiful as a smiling newborn. For years, marketers have caught on to this, providing uplifting content that features babies in the forefront. One example is an Evian campaign that features babies on roller skates, dancing to “The Rapper’s Delight.” The video has over 18 million views on YouTube. Another example is the famous E*Trade baby commercials that we look forward to while watching the Superbowl every year.

But beyond just babies, the team at our Orlando marketing agency thinks the fanfare around using babies to market your brand offers opportunities to make emotional connections to their target consumers. By being able to identify with their users, marketers can target the emergence of celebrity baby stories, and can often leverage these no matter what their relationship to baby products.

Through Twitter and Facebook, companies attach to celebrity baby stories that seem to fall in line with their brand stories and brand visions. Motherhood and maternity-oriented businesses seem to be especially in line with welcoming newborns, though it seems that broader companies like Target and Wal-Mart could stand to benefit just the same.

When the royal baby was born merely months ago, Twitter was on fire with tweets from marketers around the globe. Pampers used the birth of Baby George to promote a video under the pretense of the fact that every baby is a prince or princess, which it had obviously been waiting to push until the moment the Royal Baby arrived.

Marketers also catch on the tabloid celebrity baby fads. When Kim Kardashian and hotheaded celebrity Kanye West, recently gave birth to their daughter North West, marketers flocked to the notion that the baby could epitomize what it means to be a luxury baby brand. Additionally, there are rumors that Kim herself is planning to launch a clothing line for babies, attesting to the marketing power of celebrity status and the Kardashian family’s ability to capitalize on it.

[quote]The luxury baby market is expected to be a $10.4 billion industry in 2014, with strollers going for as much as $3,000 for an Aston Martin brand leather stroller.[/quote]

By latching on to uplifting baby stories, marketers can identify with the emotions behind the brand’s mission. In joining the conversation, these marketers prove they are in tune with things that are happening in the world, and that they are appreciative of the uplifting nature of a good celeb baby story.

Be it Alec Baldwin, Fergie or Simon Cowell, fans love and support stars on their mission to start or continue growing their families. By offering comforting tweets about celebrity babies, marketers can seize the opportunity to join the conversation, while also pushing their products incidentally.

Brand are solidified based on their relationships with potential customers, so encouraging chatter about celebrity babies and being early informers of such breaking news helps drive a brand’s social media.

The best thing about all this is that people aren’t going to stop having babies anytime soon, and as long as there are babies, there will be opportunities for people to love seeing them. The team at our Florida marketing agency thinks celebrity #babies can help brands see #success! Contact us today to learn more!

Why Email Marketing Maintains Its Value & Why You Should Use It

Email marketing is a very important aspect of almost any business’s growth. It’s how brands, both large and small, communicate sales, special events and interesting content in order to help the brand remain on the subscriber’s mind. Many companies require submission to their email lists in order to use their services.  And, it’s a simple equation: people are willing to give up their email and personal information to receive some utility, even if it means accidentally subscribing to an email list you might not have accepted otherwise.

Each day, I receive at least twenty emails from companies trying to offer me a product or service. Sometimes, I’ll even receive three or more emails from the same company. I had to unsubscribe from Spotify because it would email me each time one of my friends joined the social network! It’s easy for a marketer to want to shy away from this model… after all, who doesn’t despise the task of going through and deleting irrelevant emails on a daily basis?

But, the reality is that email marketing remains valuable because it works. As much as I’m complaining, I recently purchased a Groupon for discount personal training sessions. I saw it in my inbox, it looked like a good deal, the location was convenient, and I was sold.

[quote] Take a peek at how email marketing served a beneficial purpose for an Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children donorship event – thanks to BIGEYEs’ effective strategies! [/quote]

How else would I have known about the sale? Perhaps Facebook or other social media? Unfortunately, it’s unlikely that I would have seen it there. Groupon’s hyper local model isn’t exactly conducive to allowing the company to tweet every single deal from its master account, and I’m only on Twitter a couple of times a day anyway, so I could easily miss the notice. Facebook is even worse… last year, Facebook announced that the average Facebook post reaches only 16% of fans.   Sponsored posts are supposed to take care of this problem, but only go so far in reaching intended audience segments. For one, if multiple brands are running sponsored posts targeting the same group, the individuals are bound to miss at least some of those postings.

Email marketing is a great way to ensure that your audience at least has the opportunity to receive your message. Unfortunately, email marketing presents some complications in and of its own. First of all, in an era of glut, how do you get people to sign up for your list? And, once they sign up, how to you ensure that they’ll actually open it and ultimately convert that person to a purchaser?

These questions are tough to tackle, and may require some advanced strategies to address. However, your company can invest in an email client that helps service some of your needs and provide analytical data as to open rates, click-throughs and conversions. This data can be invaluable in assessing what your potential customers need.

For more ideas and suggestions as to how your company can use email marketing to help gain customers, please contact our Orlando marketing agency – you can even sign up for our email list to receive the BIGEYE Newsletter for regular updates.

Hot trends in hotel advertising: Subtlety works best

“I want a feast
I want a bean feast

Cream buns and doughnuts and fruitcake with no nuts so good you could go nuts.

No, now!

I want a ball

I want a party

Pink macaroons and a million balloons and performing baboons and

Give it to me now.

I want the world,

I want the whole world.

I want to lock it all up in my pocket

It’s my bar of chocolate

Give it to me now!

I want today

I want tomorrow

I want to wear them like braids in my hair and I don’t want to share them

I want a party with roomfuls of laughter

Ten thousand ton of ice cream

And if I don’t get the things I am after

I’m going to scream!

I want the works,

I want the whole works!

Presents and prizes and sweets and surprises in all shapes and sizes,

And now!

Don’t care how I want it now!

Don’t care how I want it now!”

The above song may be a harmonious tantrum performed by one Veruca Salt in the 1971 film adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, but the lyrics speak to the way a hotel should perceive its guests. That’s not to say that all guests are sniveling, snotty-nosed adolescents, but for an industry that deals in comfort and convenience, it doesn’t hurt to operate under that assumption. The average overnighter takes for granted the luxuries a hotel provides. So when something does go awry, no matter how miniscule, the concierge often takes an ear-licking.

Guests expect their stay to go off without a hitch. They don’t want to see an establishment’s seams, so to speak. So, a hotel must present itself as competent, discreet and ahead of the curve. There are numerous approaches that can be taken to this end. Here, we discuss four:

1. Street propaganda:

Guerrilla marketing, a low budget, avant-garde approach to self-promotion can be highly effective in portraying an out of the box, curatorial image to a potential client; it also falls into the discreet category. A good propaganda campaign should promote with clever subtlety. Our Florida advertising agency knows the value of this technique lies in its ties to social media marketing. A really creative guerrilla strategy can take on a life of its own by inspiring observers to document their reactions through Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and countless other social media sites. The following link demonstrates several examples of unique street propaganda:

http://www.boredpanda.com/cool-and-creative-street-ads/

2. Easy online accessibility:

Hotel’s must make their website accessible and up-to-date. The site should leave no question unanswered. A customer should be able to book a room, dinner reservation or spa appointment with the touch of a mouse. They should be able to speak to a hotel representative via online chat. Basically, a hotel’s website should act as an interactive reception desk. Daily updates and notices regarding not just the hotel, but also the surrounding area can be helpful as well. It pays to work with a good developer who is aware of the latest advents and limitations of the Internet.

3. Go green image:

Environmentally conscious business practices are key. More so than a hotel making sure it’s operating with the tiniest footprint it can muster, it should also promote these efforts to its guests. If the restaurant in the hotel only uses organic, farm-to-table ingredients, this should be made known. If the lobby motif is made from recycled materials, shout it from the rooftops. After all, green is definitely the new black. Guests will respect any effort to that end.

4. Respond to online comments:

Yet another cheap and fruitful way to make a positive impression with an audience is to keep up with what that audience is saying. This is sort of a no brainer, but to be truly effective, don’t just keep track of sites like Trip Advisor or Travelocity. Instead, reply to comments, be those comments good or bad, with useful information. If a past guest complained about an obstructed room view, apologize and offer them a room with a better view during their next stay. If another applauds the tuna tartar at your dining establishment, thank them kindly and tell them they’re a real mensch for saying so. This practice makes a hotel seem more human; less like a machine on autopilot.

In search of a hotel advertising strategy to ensure that your visitors will also become your biggest fans? Contact our team of marketing experts today!

Is Your Marketing Campaign Mom-Friendly? Learn Why It Should Be

Over the past two decades, Moms have controlled up to 80% of household spending. When you break it down, they are not only buying for themselves but for many other age groups and demographics including adults, babies, tweens, teens, males and females. By putting in some consideration and tailoring your marketing campaigns to fit this influential consumer group, you could reap quite the harvest in customer conversion and tap into a market that will keep giving.
As a Florida advertising agency we make sure our clients consider the demographic they are marketing to. If the age range or product falls anywhere close to the “Mom” demographic, we like to ask the following questions as we develop or critique an existing marketing campaign:

Question 1: Are my marketing campaigns easy to read and navigate on a mobile phone?

From juggling careers, family schedules and keeping the home in order, Moms are always on the go and use their trusty mobile sidekicks to keep up the pace. According to BabyCenter’s September 2012 Media Mom Report, 65% of moms have smart phones (38% higher than the general US population). Quick, easy and straightforward is the name of the game when you’re dealing with Moms and mobile media. In fact, BabyCenter’s monthly poll states 91% of smartphone equipped Moms expect websites to be mobile friendly.

Pay specific attention to:

    • Clear click-through links: Consider the webpage that your ad, email campaign or image may link them to. Does it bring the audience straight to the desired destination? Or does it lead them to a home page that they would have to scroll through to find the information or product?
    • Mobile visuals: How does it visually look on the phone? Is the image clear? Is the color scheme eye-catching and easily understandable?
    • Clear call to action: Does the content clearly and concisely state what you would like them to do? For example: “Click Here to Order.”

Question 2: What kind of woman am I marketing to?

Stereotypes and assumptions of a Mom’s role can often be detrimental to a marketing campaign if skewed in the wrong direction. Mothers no longer fit within the “Leave it To Beaver” role these days and are sometimes categorized somewhere between stressed and tired or on an episode of Real Housewives. The truth is that Mom’s are women first, modern, forward thinking women who have added responsibilities like children, a spouse and other family members. Mom-hood doesn’t change the fact that they are still women and want to feel beautiful, empowered and all around badass, plus able to cook a mean grilled cheese sandwich.

Question 3: Just how social is my marketing campaign?

Moms are all about relationships and look to social sites like Facebook that promote that relational connection. In fact most Moms spend their socializing time on Facebook because of the information and content sharing capabilities between friends and family. Twitter has been found to be more influential with the tech savvy and higher wage-earning Mom. To reach the mainstream Mom market, use Facebook for social promotions and talk to those Moms because they are certainly talking too.

To learn more about how you can market to moms in order to create brand preference and instill brand loyalty, contact our team of experts today! We’re poised to discuss strategies for segmentation, creating appeals and assessing your own brand to determine perfect target market for your business.

Resources:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/babycenter-reveals-five-trends-that-impact-the-business-of-mom-172863301.html
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703521304576278964279316994.html#project%3DNUMBERS_GUY_1104%26articleTabs%3Dinteractive%20OR%20http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703521304576278964279316994.html

Understanding How Young People Use Technology Today

Sometimes, the rapid speed of technology makes me feel older than my years (and I’m not even that old!).  Back in my day, we didn’t have tablets or smart phones – most people didn’t even have computers.  We had to communicate to one another by dialing them on a home phone, and, if my parents couldn’t reach me because I wasn’t where I said I was going to be, then I would be in big trouble when I got home.

But things have changed a lot since then, and parents have lots of ways to keep track of their children.  Young people communicate through text messaging, preferring that method over email due to its convenience.  They don’t even really have to learn handwriting – they’re practically born with keyboards in their hands.  Even when dealing with a slightly older generation, some of the 20-somethings I know don’t even own televisions, since they get all of their media from the computer.

Interesting to think about, isn’t it?  These technologies that once were innovative and paved the future for us are now barely even relevant.  That’s why, as someone who works within digital media, I find it important to keep up with the newest technology – to play with it, own it and learn how to use it.

While TV is not dying anytime soon (how could it, with so many baby boomers who’ve grown up with televisions?), it’s important to take notice of the ways young people use, engage with and interact with technology.  This is a new generation, full of young people who are “digital natives.”  And, the disconnect is clear: while some marketers and advertisers have found ways to reach these people, lots of digital media initiatives still miss the mark.

For instance, I go on YouTube all the time, but I couldn’t name a single YouTube celebrity without the help of our marketing interns.  But they point me to Ray William Johnson and Daily Grace, both of whom are completely unrecognizable to parents, yet have millions of teen/young adult followers on the internet.

Or, take the popularity of mobile gaming.  Some people I know play games like Tetris or Bejeweled on their mobile devices, but young people take mobile gaming to a whole new level.  Through role-playing games that contain a social component, they can interact with an entire new world where in-game currency can be exchanged for real-life currency.

(And that DEFINITELY didn’t exist when I was a kid!)

If you work for a brand and are aiming to ramp up your digital presence, it is essential to keep track of the newest gadgets, games and trends in technology.  With an abundance of blogs like Gizmodo and TechCrunch, there’s no reason that marketers can’t be in touch with the ways that young people use tech.

As you’re planning your digital strategy, I encourage marketers to look toward the future.  With more technologies becoming widely available each day, it’s important to carefully plan your strategy to ensure that it’s reaching the audience where they are.  Our Orlando marketing agency advises you to spend a little bit of time getting to know what’s new in technology, in order to help gap between digitally divided generations.